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  • Depression and social distancing
    Social distancing is the act of avoiding large gatherings, staying several feet away from the next person in the room, and most certainly not shaking hands, hugging or even fist bumping. Read more
  • Managing stress and anxiety about the coronavirus
    The media is in a frenzy. So is social media. So are families chatting over dinner. The fear and panic surrounding the virus is, for many, more frightening than the illness itself. Read more
  • How to mend a broken heart
    A quick Google search on just that -- how to mend a broken heart -- results in nearly 10 billion entries. “Can you die of a broken heart?” nets about 400 million results. It’s safe to say, then, that a broken heart may be just as common as the common cold -- and like the common cold, has no single, hard and fast, guaranteed cure. Read more
  • Social Anxiety Myths
    Learn the truths about many of the myths behind social anxiety, and what it's like for someone who suffers from it. Read more
  • Dialectical behavior therapy: states of mind
    In order to achieve mindfulness, it's important to achieve three different states of mind: rational mind, emotion mind, and wise mind. Dialectical behavior therapy can help you to strengthen the skills you need so you can live mindfully. Read more
  • What is health anxiety?
    Health anxiety brings with it a persistent belief that your symptoms are actually those of a serious medical condition. The worry you have over your health becomes so consuming, so distressing, that it affects how you live, think, and operate. For those with severe health anxiety, it can become absolutely crippling. Read more
  • How to deal with grief over the holidays
    If you’ve lost someone too, whether it’s recently or from years ago, know that it’s normal to feel unbearable pain. The holidays may trigger a response on you that you may not expect – some have said they just want to crawl into bed and sleep the season away, while others say they drown themselves in busy work so they don’t have to feel. Read more
  • How to prepare for the DBT experience
    Dialectical behavior therapy is a treatment that was developed by Dr. Marsha Linehan in the 1980s. It was originally designed to treat borderline personality disorder, but has since been proven to be an effective treatment for a whole host of mental health disorders, including depression, PTSD, and anxiety. Read more
  • What is mindfulness and how does it help with DBT?
    Mindfulness is the act of being present in the moment. If you can pay attention to what is going on around you, where you are, what you’re feeling, what you’re seeing, what you’re hearing, all in this exact moment in time, you’re being mindful. Read more
  • Kids and generalized anxiety disorder
    Children and teenagers can experience anxiety too. Young people who have generalized anxiety disorder, or GAD, report feeling stressed out and excessively, uncontrollably worried about what we might consider trivial matters, as well as about future events. Read more
  • The emotional symptoms of anxiety
    Anxiety is highly subjective – what one person with generalized anxiety disorder feels, another may not. Along with physical symptoms that might arise as a result of an anxiety disorder, there are a number of emotional symptoms too. Read more
  • 5 tips for impulse control issues
    When a person with an impulse control disorder begins to feel the urge or the temptation to commit this activity, he typically feels a rising anxiety, as if he’ll explode if he doesn’t do it. Once he performs the action, he may feel a huge sense of relief or even a rush of satisfaction and happiness, no matter how dangerous the activity was, or despite the negative or dangerous consequences of that activity. Read more
  • Destroy your anxiety by building up your confidence
    Those with an anxiety disorder tend to also suffer from chronic and seriously low self-esteem. Anxiety is really good at twisting what’s actually happening into what it wants you to think as real. Read more
  • Behavioral symptoms of anxiety
    When people are anxious, they can have physical symptoms and emotional symptoms, but they can also have what are called behavioral symptoms. Behavioral symptoms are what people do or don’t do in their state of anxiety, and are typically a response to the unpleasant feelings of anxiety. Read more
  • What is social anxiety?
    It’s a feeling most are familiar with: that nervous, uneasy sensation of walking into a room and all eyes are on you. It’s that moment before you have to make a presentation at school or in the boardroom. It’s the nausea you might feel before a big first date, or having to introduce yourself to a room full of strange new faces. Read more
  • The physical symptoms of anxiety
    Anxiety really messes with the communication between your brain and what’s called the enteric nervous system, which is the operation behind your digestion. This disruption can cause you to become irregular. Read more
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