• Blog
RSS Feed
  • 6 tips for helping parents with a hyperactive child
    There is help for parents of children with ADHD. Even when it seems taxing, tiring, or downright impossible, you can learn how to help a child with ADHD in school, at the playground, and at home. Read more
  • Depression and impulse control disorder
    With such grave reports on conditions like depression and impulse control disorder leading to suicide, it’s no wonder that many mental health professionals are being exceedingly diligent on caring for those who are currently living with or have a history of these conditions. Read more
  • Perfectionism: another facet of anxiety
    Perfectionism, characterized by a person’s need to be perfect using unattainably high standards and a desire to succeed at any cost, is considered a personality trait and not necessarily a disorder on its own. Read more
  • Psychotherapy and the treatment of depression
    Often, psychotherapy – or “therapy,” as it’s more often called – is the first line of defense, the first kind of treatment suggested to people suffering with depression. Psychotherapy is designed to help you find recovery from depression by giving you the opportunity to talk to a mental health professional in a safe, secure and confidential space. Read more
  • Pyromania
    Pyromania is an impulse control disorder, a mental illness characterized by a person’s need to set fire. It is not an intention to hurt or destroy – it is just to satisfy an inner obsession to set fire. Read more
  • Symptoms of Oppositional Defiant Disorder
    Children who have Oppositional Defiant Disorder (ODD) seem to live by this definition. They are often angry, irritable, vindictive and insubordinate – these behaviors are typically and frequently directed at parents and other authority figures. Read more
  • Personality disorders and impulse control disorders
    Mental health professionals categorize the various types of personality disorders into three groups, or clusters – the personality disorders within each cluster are defined by similar symptoms and/or characteristics. Read more
  • 7 signs of Intermittent Explosive Disorder
    While angry behavior could be attributed to various types of anger disorders, intermittent explosive disorder is explicit and defined. Intermittent explosive disorder, a chronic disorder known to begin in childhood, and which can continue to adulthood, is characterized by sudden and repeated episodes of violent, aggressive behavior and/or hostile verbal outbursts Read more
  • Going to a playground with a child with autism
    For all children, play is significant and necessary. It permits them to develop crucial abilities like gross and fine motor skills, communication skills (both verbal and non-verbal), problem solving, thinking, and social graces. For a child with autism spectrum disorder, play may be different, but no less necessary. Read more
  • Anxiety and ADHD
    Emily also has adult ADHD. Six months ago, she was diagnosed with generalized anxiety disorder. This is her story. Anxiety is often a standalone diagnosis. So is ADHD. But for approximately half of people living with ADHD, anxiety is present as well. ADHD and stress very typically go hand in hand. Read more
  • Traveling with kids on the autism spectrum
    Traveling can be a very nerve-wracking and tense time for families affected by autism. Because kids who have autism spectrum disorder thrive on routine, regularity and predictability, parents should take care to ensure the travel experience is smooth, comfortable and unsurprising. Following are some tips on how to make the travel experience as enjoyable as possible for the whole family. Read more
  • Self-care for parents of children with autism
    As a parent of a child with autism, you are faced with this expert-backed fact: you likely experience more stress than a parent of a child who is not on the spectrum. On any given day, you’re probably juggling a tantrum (or several), threats of running away, loud meltdowns in a public space, and a trip to a physician. You’re doing all you can to visibly appear, to your child, as his or her rock, a solid guide, a strong presence. Inside, however, you may feel as though you’re falling apart. Read more
  • What is Trichotillomania?
    Trichotillomania or trich (that’s the short form) is a disorder that causes people to pull out hair from anywhere there’s hair, like the scalp, eyebrows, eyelashes, underarms, legs, even the pubic area region. Read more
  • Compulsive buying
    Impulse buying. Compulsive buyers may or may not keep a list of the items they want to buy, but they also generally don’t think first before whipping out the plastic. They buy things they don’t necessarily need, but are instead overwhelmed with the desire to buy something just to have something new. Read more
  • My friend is a kleptomaniac – how can I help?
    Kleptomania is an impulse control disorder. It’s marked by the inability to stop oneself from the urge to steal. Usually, the individual with kleptomania steals item that he or she doesn’t even need, and are probably items that don’t have much monetary value. Experts explain that the disorder is characterized by challenges with self-control and emotions; when a person with kleptomania has the urge to steal something, the pressure is on until he or she commits the act. Even with the potential of major repercussions – guilt, remorse, even an arrest – the kleptomaniac feels the need to steal anyway. Read more
  • Dialectic Behavioral Therapy (DBT) for People with Autism
    You may have heard of Dialectic Behavioral Therapy™ (DBT). It falls under and umbrella of Cognitive Behavioral Therapies that focus on changing thought processes and behaviors. It is most commonly applied to people diagnosed with Borderline Personality Disorder to regulate emotions. More recently we’ve seen practical applications for people with Autism and other Developmental and Intellectual Disabilities. Read more
No form settings found. Please configure it.
No Hours settings found. Please configure it