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  • Anxiety and ADHD
    Emily also has adult ADHD. Six months ago, she was diagnosed with generalized anxiety disorder. This is her story. Anxiety is often a standalone diagnosis. So is ADHD. But for approximately half of people living with ADHD, anxiety is present as well. ADHD and stress very typically go hand in hand. Read more
  • Traveling with kids on the autism spectrum
    Traveling can be a very nerve-wracking and tense time for families affected by autism. Because kids who have autism spectrum disorder thrive on routine, regularity and predictability, parents should take care to ensure the travel experience is smooth, comfortable and unsurprising. Following are some tips on how to make the travel experience as enjoyable as possible for the whole family. Read more
  • Self-care for parents of children with autism
    As a parent of a child with autism, you are faced with this expert-backed fact: you likely experience more stress than a parent of a child who is not on the spectrum. On any given day, you’re probably juggling a tantrum (or several), threats of running away, loud meltdowns in a public space, and a trip to a physician. You’re doing all you can to visibly appear, to your child, as his or her rock, a solid guide, a strong presence. Inside, however, you may feel as though you’re falling apart. Read more
  • What is Trichotillomania?
    Trichotillomania or trich (that’s the short form) is a disorder that causes people to pull out hair from anywhere there’s hair, like the scalp, eyebrows, eyelashes, underarms, legs, even the pubic area region. Read more
  • Compulsive buying
    Impulse buying. Compulsive buyers may or may not keep a list of the items they want to buy, but they also generally don’t think first before whipping out the plastic. They buy things they don’t necessarily need, but are instead overwhelmed with the desire to buy something just to have something new. Read more
  • My friend is a kleptomaniac – how can I help?
    Kleptomania is an impulse control disorder. It’s marked by the inability to stop oneself from the urge to steal. Usually, the individual with kleptomania steals item that he or she doesn’t even need, and are probably items that don’t have much monetary value. Experts explain that the disorder is characterized by challenges with self-control and emotions; when a person with kleptomania has the urge to steal something, the pressure is on until he or she commits the act. Even with the potential of major repercussions – guilt, remorse, even an arrest – the kleptomaniac feels the need to steal anyway. Read more
  • Dialectic Behavioral Therapy (DBT) for People with Autism
    You may have heard of Dialectic Behavioral Therapy™ (DBT). It falls under and umbrella of Cognitive Behavioral Therapies that focus on changing thought processes and behaviors. It is most commonly applied to people diagnosed with Borderline Personality Disorder to regulate emotions. More recently we’ve seen practical applications for people with Autism and other Developmental and Intellectual Disabilities. Read more
  • Addicted to gambling
    A compulsive gambler doesn’t have the ability to resist the need to gamble. Often, this need is so tantalizing, so overwhelming, that the only way to relieve it is by gambling even more. Often, compulsive gamblers refuse to admit they have a gambling issue. Sometimes it takes until they hit rock bottom – typically the loss of all savings, one’s home, or the destruction of close personal relationships – before they admit they need help. Read more
  • 5 ways to handle anxiety in the workplace
    Symptoms of anxiety at work include sleepless at night, unrealistic worries, jitteriness, fatigue or exhaustion, exaggerated reactions to small disturbances, stomach problems or headaches. You may feel sweaty, tremble often, or feel a pounding heart. When your anxiety interferes with work, here are five strategies for managing stress in the workplace. Read more
  • Foods and Anxiety
    While medication may be necessary in more severe cases of anxiety disorders, taking care to eat the right foods in a well-balanced diet is a great way to keep those symptoms of anxiety at bay. Read more
  • Types of Impulse Control Disorders
    An impulse control disorder is a term that describes a person’s inability to avoid or stop doing things that might be harmful to themselves or to other people. It’s not uncommon for people who live with this type of disorder to feel anxiety or building tension before committing the action or finding relief in the behavior – like mounting pressure, or an itch that needs to be scratched. Despite knowing how dangerous the action or behavior is, and sometimes even in spite of negative consequences, once the person has acted upon the behavior, he or she feels relieved, perhaps even happy. Read more
  • Acupuncture for stress and anxiety
    But some are turning to an ancient Eastern practice called acupuncture, which involves the insertion of needles into pressure points throughout the body. It works by assisting the nervous system achieve balance, alleviating stress and anxiety symptoms. It’s been reported that acupuncture can give individual rapid results, often working within only one to two sessions. However, like any treatment, results and the number of sessions will vary from person to person. Read more
  • 5 tips for parenting a child with ODD
    What causes ODD is thought to be a combination of factors, including biological, social and psychological reasons. It typically occurs in children who have also been diagnosed or have a history of ADHD. If you recognize yourself or your family in the above situation and are seeking some tips, the following are some oppositional defiant disorder strategies for parents that can help. These can be used to discipline a defiant teenager as well as a defiant toddler, and they are also helpful strategies for teachers dealing with oppositional defiant disorder in the classroom. Read more
  • 5 tips for helping children with ADHD deal with Aggression
    Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder, better known as its acronym ADHD, is the most commonly diagnosed mental health condition diagnosed in children and teenagers today. Children and young people who have been diagnosed with ADHD typically show signs of hyperactive behavior – which includes the need to constantly be active, are easily distracted, atypically impulsive, are unable to concentrate, and may constantly fidget. Read more
  • 5 tips for helping children with ADHD deal with the fidgets
    Children who have been diagnosed with ADHD typically need to constantly move, running instead of walking, climbing things that other children wouldn’t naturally think to climb. But another symptom that children with ADHD have is constant fidgeting. Fidgeting and ADHD go hand in hand. Read more
  • 5 tips for adults dealing with ADHD and irritability
    For many adults with ADHD, one of the symptoms most reported isn’t the inability to stay still or to listen to members of authority - but rather the intrusive and unpleasant feelings of irritability that can arise even at the smallest and most trivial of moments. Read more
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